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Table 2 Study results structured by effects on attentional bias and symptoms

From: The effectiveness of attentional bias modification for substance use disorder symptoms in adults: a systematic review

Results Publications ordered by substance Amount of sessions AB at baseline
AB + Symp − Alcohol:  
  Field et al. 2007 [33] 1 No AB
  Lee and Lee 2015 [26] 1 AB founda
  Schoenmakers et al. 2007 [30] 1 No ABa
AB − Symp + Nicotine:  
  Elfeddali et al. 2016b [23] 6 AB found
AB unknown Symp + Alcohol:  
  Cox et al. 2015 [35] 4 Not reported
  Fadardi and Cox 2009 [13] 4 AB found
  McGeary et al. 2014 [28] 8 Not reported
  Wiers et al. 2015 [36] 4 Not reported
AB + Symp + Alcohol:  
  Field and Eastwood 2005 [24] 1 No ABa
  Schoenmakers et al. 2010 [31] 5 No ABa
Nicotine:  
  Attwood et al. 2008c [21] 1 AB found
  Kerst and Waters 2014 [25] 21 AB found
Opiate:  
  Ziaee et al. 2016 [32] 3 Not reported
AB − Symp − Nicotine:  
  Begh et al. 2015 [22] 5 No AB
  Lopes et al. 2014 [34] 1–3 AB found
  McHugh et al. 2010 [29] 1 No AB
Opiate:  
  Charles et al. 2015 [37] 1 No AB
  Mayer et al. 2016 [27] 5 No AB
  1. Studies in clinical population are presented in italics
  2. AB + attentional bias significantly changed from baseline to post-test/s, AB − attentional bias did not change from baseline to post-test/s, AB unknown changes in attentional bias were not reported or unclear, Symp + significant change on one or more addiction outcome measures from baseline to post-test/s, Symp − addiction outcome measures did not change from baseline to post-test/s
  3. aBased on calculations from data derived from tables or figures (see supporting information)
  4. bSignificant changes in symptoms (abstinence) was only found in subsample (heavy smokers)
  5. cSignificant changes in symptoms (subjective craving) was only found in subsample (males)